Welcome Back to School!

As the temperatures outside start to cool off, we often start to see changing priorities for families. Time for school and a consistent daily schedule, time for some of our favorite sports and outdoor activities to start back up, and time to thinking about germs. Now I know everyone is already tired of talking about COVID-19 and the impact it has had on our lives but it reminds us that we are all in this together. Our decisions impact everyone around us, especially those that we love and care for.

Germs are and will continue to be part of our world but there are many everyday things we can do to protect others.

  • Wash your hands- Just because things look clean… doesn’t mean that they are. Always use soap and water (for at least 20 seconds) and when you can’t, try to use hand sanitizer.
  • Cover your cough or sneeze- There is much talk about masks these days and as a medical provider worried about colds, flu, and COVID I recommend wearing them, especially during this time. We know from the time that we are small children that many germs come from our mouths. Covering our mouths to prevent spreading our germs to others is just one more step we can take to protect those around us. 
  • Be careful what you touch- Germs, although microscopic, can have a huge impact on our health. Germs exist in the air as well as on surfaces. Think about those things that you touch all of the time… and try to sanitize things that are touched all of the time by many people.
  • Flu vaccine- This year more than ever we need to consider what a fever will mean for those around us. The more we can do this fall to prevent illness will really help get and keep our lives on track. Consider getting your child in for their annual Well visit or even getting in when appropriate to keep them up to date with vaccinations… your Pediatricians thank you!

– Dr. Dan Moorman

NOW OPEN! John R. Rogers High School Clinic

Healthcare can be complex, especially in today’s busy world. Many provider hours are limited to the school day, and offices may be located far from the school. That means students have to take time away from school and possibly find a ride, making it difficult to get the care they need while maintaining academics.

School-based health centers (SBHC) tackle that problem directly by adding an on campus clinic, making getting the care you need as simple as walking to the other side of the building.

Why school-based health centers?

Essentially, school-based health centers is an extension of your neighborhood health clinic in the school.

Healthy students are better learners. When students don’t feel well, it’s much harder to learn and pay attention in class. Not to mention days where students may be too ill to come to class at all, making it harder to catch up on materials.

School-based health centers aim to tackle this by offering an easy–to-access clinic where students don’t have to take time off to be seen by a provider.


According to data from the School-Based Health Alliance, school-based health centers:

  • Help students do better in school
  • Increase high school graduation rates
  • Decrease school discipline cases

How is a SBHC different from the school nurse’s office?

A SBHC is a fully-licensed primary care facility, providing a range of physical and mental health services, with limited dental services.  SBHC’s and school nurses work closely together, with school nurses able to refer students to the SBHC to resolve student health problems.

What services will CHAS Health at John R. Rogers -based health centeroffer?

This new clinic will be for students and school staff only, and will provide the following services:

• Primary medical care

• Answers to your health questions and concerns

• Treatment of common injuries and illnesses (allergies, rashes, sore throat, etc.)

• Counseling (help with emotional and social issues)

• Sports physicals

• Vaccinations, including flu shots

• Reproductive health services

• and much more

CHAS Health at John R. Rogers High School be staffed by Jeff Hayward, Family Practice Physician Assistant; Kristie Stolgitis, Pediatric Nurse Practitioner; Michelle Timmerman, Behavioral Health Proivder; Kelsey Kienbaum, Medical Assistant.  Johnnie Beans serves as the School Outreach Specialist, and is actively engaged in connecting with the students and staff.


Hours of operation will be Monday – Friday 7:30 am to 4:00 pm with both scheduled appointments and same day walk-in appointments available. 


School-based health centers often are operated as a partnership between the school and a community health organization, such as a community health center, hospital, or local health department. The specific services provided by school-based health centers vary based on community needs and resources as determined through collaborations between the community, the school district and the health care providers.

CHAS Health at John R. Rogers High School is made possible thanks to funding from Kaiser Permanente, in partnership with Spokane Public Schools.

For a more in-depth look at studies on school-based health centers:  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3770486/