Love Them. Protect Them. Immunize Them.

Community Health Association of Spokane Valley Clinic With it being National Infant Immunization Week (NIIW), it is a great time to make sure we are promoting, encouraging, educating and reminding parents to have their children immunized. If infants are not immunized the consequences can be severe and in some cases the preventable diseases can even be fatal. It’s easy for us to believe that these preventable diseases are a thing of the past but, as we have seen with the recent cases of measles and pertussis in our community, these diseases still exist.

CHAS offers immunizations through the Vaccines for Children’s program. The program is federally funded and provides vaccinations for children through the age of 18 at no cost.

Infant immunization protects from vaccine-preventable diseases throughout their life and offers protection against the 14 diseases below:

Hepatitis A – A virus that causes liver infection.

Hepatitis B – A virus that causes liver infection. In some cases, Hepatitis B remains in the liver for life and can lead to further complications including liver cancer.

Diphtheria– A potentially fatal condition in which the airways can become blocked, restricting breathing. Also associated with heart problems and paralysis of throat muscles needed for swallowing.

Hib Disease (Haemophilus Influenzae Type b) – A serious disease which can cause meningitis and pneumonia.

Pertussis (whooping cough) – A potentially fatal bacteria that is very contagious with symptoms including persistent violent coughing and choking which can last for weeks. It is particularly worrisome in infants and young children.

Pneumococcal Disease – A potentially fatal bacterial infection which can cause pneumonia.

Polio – A viral infection with possible symptoms of fever, pain, sore throat, head ache and in some cases paralysis and death.

Influenza (flu) – A bacteria that can cause respiratory complications and can result in hospitalization or death. Infants, young children, pregnant women, and the elderly are at higher risk of complications related to influenza.

Measles -A potentially fatal disease caused by a virus whose symptoms include cough, fever and rash. In severe cases, measles can cause brain damage, pneumonia, and seizures.

Mumps – A virus that causes headaches, fever, pain and swelling in the salivary glands.

Rotavirus – A virus that causes severe diarrhea and vomiting which usually lasts days. Complications can include severe dehydration and possible hospitalization.

Rubella (German Measles) – A virus with of fever, rash and swollen glands. A pregnant woman with rubella is at greater risk of miscarriage and her baby may have physical defects including loss of sight or hearing and heart problems.

Tetanus (Lockjaw) – A condition caused by bacteria, which affects the muscles, causing them to spasm. A person may experience headaches, increased blood pressure, elevated body temperature and muscle pain. The jaw muscles may spasm causing the jaw to ‘lock’.

Varicella (Chickenpox) – A highly contagious virus whose symptoms cause blister-like rash, sever itching, fever. Can cause severe complications that can lead to hospitalization.

So let’s do our part in making sure that parents and caregivers are educated on the importance of vaccinating and protecting their children against vaccine-preventable diseases.

References:

www.cdc.gov

www.immunize.org

 

-By Shereen Martin, Medical Support Supervisor

Meet your provider: Deena Solomon

CHAS Dr. Solomon

I recently sat down with Perry St. Clinic’s pediatrician, Deena Solomon to get to know a little bit more about what makes her so great to work with.

Tell us about yourself…

My name is Deena Solomon, Pediatrician at the new Perry St. clinic! I am originally from New York, I grew up in Staten Island, went to medical school in Tel Aviv University in Israel, and did my residency in the pediatric department at King’s County hospital and University Medical center of Brooklyn, New York. After that, I worked as a pediatrician for 3 years in an outpatient clinic Staten Island Hospital. We moved to Spokane 6 years ago and have been a stay at home mom up until I started working at CHAS, about 6 months ago.

What initially drew you to Pediatrics vs any other branch of medicine?

CHILDREN! I love kids, I think that kids are extremely honest, which makes them so fun to work with. They always tell the truth the way they see it, and I always appreciate that about them.

Do you have children yourself?

I have 3 kids, a 7 year old son, and 2 daughters, 5 and 4 years old.

Do you have any special connection to the Perry District?

I live on the South Hill and I frequently visit the Perry District. I am excited to be in a place close to where my kids are attending school, I’m familiar with District 81 schools, sports available at those schools, parks to play at nearby, and things to do in nearby. I’m excited to relate to families in Perry and to be more conversational about what’s going on in their neighborhood. I’m especially excited to start building more relationships with families in the area.

When you aren’t taking care of kids, what are you doing?

(Laughs) When I’m not taking care of kids at CHAS, I’m taking care of my own kids at home! So, lots of outside play time. Right now, it’s all about basketball. My two oldest are involved playing at the YMCA, so most weekends are spent practicing and playing in games. But, now that the weather is getting good, it’s also going to be more about riding bikes and being out at the playgrounds. It’s basically all kids all the time.

What do you listen to get you excited for the day?

I listen to comedy talk shows, but I also enjoy quiet drives to work, since I’m always around kids at work and at home. The 10-15 minute car ride on the way here is the best way to get me prepped for the day.

What do patients/co-workers like about you?

I am pretty easy to speak to, and I think I am a good listener and people appreciate that about me. Especially parents with concerns about their children.

What’s the best advice you’ve ever received?

That’s a really easy one, one of my mentors during my rotations was a big inspiration to me, he always made a point of reminding me, “less is more when it comes to pediatrics.” When there is a question of whether you should do an invasive test, intervention, blood test or x-ray, it’s usually best to avoid it. Typically best for kids not to go through the trauma of excessive testing. He always said a children’s place is at home, if there is any way you can get a kid at home vs. in the emergency room or in the hospital for an extended time, that’s where they should be.

Doc McStuffins or Jake and the Neverland Pirates?

I love Doc McStuffins! The show promotes all the values I would want to promote in my own kids. They show that both male and female roles aren’t predetermined and you can do anything you put your mind to! I also appreciate the diversity of the show…plus she’s a doctor!

What makes you unique?

I think my life experience, growing up in New York, my parents emigrating from Eastern Europe, living in Israel, traveling a ton in my life, and marrying someone with a very different background than my own (because my husband is Middle Eastern). My take on everything is a little unique because of all the different experiences and backgrounds influencing my life and it gives me a unique perspective.

What do you enjoy most about working at CHAS?

I really like that everyone is really working towards the mission of CHAS, (The mission of CHAS is to improve the overall health of the communities we serve by expanding access to quality health and wellness services), and it’s really been a pleasure for me to see that everybody I have met has a really positive outlook on what they are doing and working towards that mission. I love the fact that CHAS has been around for 20 years and we are making a big difference in our community and we are continuing to expand to all areas of our community. I’m really happy to be part of that.

Deena can’t wait for the Perry St. opening on March 23rd!

 

By Matt Grebe

Talking with baby

Community Health Association of Spokane Valley Clinic

 

Did you know something as simple as talking to your baby can help them be more successful in school?  75% of your baby’s brain development occurs in the first 2 years of life.  You are your baby’s first teacher!  The more words they are exposed to during this time the better.  Simple things like telling your child what you are doing, “Mommy is making your bottle now,” and pointing out things you see, “Look at the big red ball,” help their language develop.  You may be tempted to turn the TV on and let your baby be exposed to language that way.  Unfortunately, studies have shown this actually makes their language development worse.  Instead, turn the tv off and talk directly to your baby throughout the day, making eye contact with them, and giving them a chance to respond.  This helps with language and communication skills that are needed throughout life.

Books and songs are another way to help develop their language skills.  Sing simple songs over and over again, and you will quickly see that they will begin to recognize the song.  Exposing them to books is a great opportunity.  You might find your 6 month old baby has no interest in sitting down and reading a book, but let them explore books.  They will probably start by sticking it in their mouth, but soon they will start looking at the pictures, and before you know it they will have their own favorite book.  Your baby may not want to sit on your lap and read the entire book.  That’s ok!  Flip through the book with them.  Point out different pictures.  Practice animal sounds.  Your baby will enjoy the time spent cuddling with you, while also building a foundation for their developing language and a love for reading.

By Ashlee Mickelson, Physician

Back to School Time!

Well its back to school time and that means getting your kids ready for the next school year. Im also sure as a parent you are thinking about the well being of your child over this next year and  ways to keep them healthy and active. One way to do this is to encourage physical activity and playing school sports or extra curricular sports activites. Please remember that schools need a Sports form filled out yearly so they can ensure that your child is healthy enough to participate. We can do this at their yearly physical or we can see them for a sports physical to get them playing right away.The difference in the two checkups is we have more time to discuss other health concerns or even old medical concerns at a Well Child Checkup. Please schedule either checkup today if your child needs one.
Its also time to start thinking about Immunizations for the year as well. Influenza season is coming and we will be looking to get everyone immunized over the next several months. Please consider this immunization and call us to discuss if your child is up to date on all of their immunizations. Recent changes to vaccines and new guidelines are making it very important for your Medical provider to closely review the immunization records to ensure that you and your child are fully protected from vaccine preventable diseases. Please let us know how we can help you.

Dan Moorman, M.D.

Dramamine