5 Things You Can Do To Prepare for Bloomsday 2020!

Bloomsday 2020 is quickly approaching and on May 3rd 2020, nearly 50,000 people will take the streets of Spokane to run, jog, or walk their way through 7.5 miles.

The question though, what can I be doing now to get prepared for Bloomsday? Just like any race, training for Bloomsday takes dedication and hard work, we put together a list of 5 things you can do to get prepped for the big race.

Bloomsday
  • Get started on a running or walking program

There are endless options out there to improve your endurance when preparing for a long-distance run or walk, so find one that best caters to your needs and goals. Interval training is a great way to get your heart rate up and give your body the boost it needs to keep running during steady periods of time. If you plan on walking, it’s a good idea to get into a weekly or even daily walking routine to prepare your muscles and joints for the 7.5-mile trek through Spokane streets—it’s also a great excuse to do some sightseeing as the weather begins to warm up!

  • Join a team or get a partner

Exercising with other people can often be a lot more fun than just going by yourself. When we have a reliable teammate or partner to push us, we tend to reach past our own expectations and reach our goals efficiently. Find someone who is going to give you that push you need and you may just build a lifelong love for exercise.

  • Increase your water intake

It is recommended that the average person drinks between 5-8 eight-ounce glasses of water a day. When preparing for the big race, it’s important to consistently drink water throughout the day and get in the habit of drinking water BEFORE you are even thirsty. Though Bloomsday doesn’t take place during a hot month, 7.5 miles often takes a lot of sweat—refuel and recharge.

  • Visit your physician

Though Bloomsday participants run and walk at all levels, it’s a good idea to visit your health care provider before starting a training program to make sure your health is not at risk. They can also let you know if your finish time goal is reasonable and give you tips for proper training.

  • Start stretching regularly

It is always good to stretch before and after doing any strenuous physical activity, but daily stretching is great at increasing flexibility to prevent future injury. If you don’t have much experience with stretching, taking up a Yoga class or even finding a TV program that teaches stretching, Yoga or Pilates at home could be beneficial to your Bloomsday experience.

Most importantly, have fun! Bloomsday 2020 is a great way to connect with family, friends, and community – all while enjoying some exercise. We hope to see you out there this year. For more information on Bloomsday 2020, check out https://www.bloomsdayrun.org/ .

5 Rules for Screen Time.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Everyone loves screen time.  Whether it is watching a movie, playing a video game, reading the news, or talking with friends, technology is at the center of all of our lives.  Media and screen time, like most things, should be used in moderation.  While technology use is important in most facets of life today, too much screen time has been linked to obesity, difficulty sleeping, problems in school, aggressive behavior, and bullying.  It is important to help your child find a healthy balance.  A few simple guidelines can help keep screen time in check for you and your family:

  1. Remove all screens from the bedroom. Kids with TVs in the bedroom have been found to watch 1 ½ hours more TV than kids without TVs in the bedroom.  TVs in the bedroom have also been linked to obesity.  Availability of internet and texting in your child’s bedroom gives them unmonitored access to anything on the internet.  Keep all screens (including your own) out of the bedroom.  Try setting up a charging station for all devices in a common area.
  2. Monitor what your children are doing during their screen time! Just like you would ask who they are spending time with on the weekend, ask who they are spending time with on social media.  It is important to teach children what is and is not appropriate to share on social media.  Also, be aware of the websites they are going to and the apps they are using.  Play apps and video games with them!  Then you know what they are doing and if it is appropriate.
  3. Make sure screen time is age appropriate and educational. Not sure if a movie or video game is good for your child? Check out commonsensemedia.org.  This website is run by a nonprofit organization that provides independent ratings for movies, TV shows, video games, and apps.  It provides you with a summary of the game or video and suggested ages for appropriate use.
  4. Limit screen time for everyone in the family. All children should spend no more than 2 hours in front of a screen for non-school purposes.  Think of things you can do as a family that does not involve a screen: go for a walk, play a board game, go to the park, or read a book together.  Any activity that provides family interaction is preferred to screen time!
  5. No screens after dinner. We know that looking at a screen keeps your body from releasing melatonin.  Without melatonin you don’t feel sleepy when bedtime comes.  Sleep is important to help with mood, concentration, and learning.  If sleep is a problem for your child, try a screen fast (by eliminating electronic device use for a few weeks) to see if this helps restore a good sleep pattern.

 

Screen use is here to stay.  Help your child form good, healthy screen habits!

-Ashlee Mickelson, MD Pediatrician

Birth Plans!

Should I write a Birth Plan?

Many women want to write out a birth plan to clarify the care they hope to receive while they are in labor.  A birth plan can be a short wish list or a long explanation of your circumstance, such as if you are adopting the child out or if there are known anomalies incompatible with life.

Is a Birth Plan required?  No.  The nurses, midwives, and physicians are highly trained professionals who will take care of you to the best of their abilities.  We have not performed routine shaves, enemas, or episiotomies for over 25 years, so you do not need to request that we refrain from these procedures.  We have many tools in our bag of tricks to help your labor progress well and hopefully avoid complications.

In addition, every woman and every labor is different.  It is a good idea for you to relax, let go, and accept the labor that comes to you.  There really is no other choice but to deal with the reality of the moment.  Your care providers will help you.  Honest.  That’s what we have chosen to do for our career.  We want the best outcome for you and your family.

I do recommend that my mammas write up a short, one-page wish list that gives the labor team a frame of reference of what experience you are hoping for in labor and delivery.  It is a good idea to designate one person to speak for you if you are unable to speak for yourself due to an intense labor.  It tells us if you have specific requests, such as dad cutting the umbilical cord or your desire to avoid an epidural or even GIVE ME THE EPIDURAL THE MOMENT I WALK IN THE DOOR!

Bring your birth plan to one of your prenatal visits to discuss with your midwife or physician.  Then when you have a final draft, bring a printed copy for the nurse caring for you in labor and delivery.  That way, your entire team is on board with the plan and works with you!  Remember to keep it short and flexible.

Some ideas of what women specify in a birth plan:

  • Who will be present for the birth?
  • Are you bringing a doula?
  • Will there be siblings present?
  • Do you want mobility or do you want to stay in bed?
  • What activities or positions do you plan to use (walking, birthing ball, standing, tub, squatting, etc)?
  • What is your plan for pain relief (massage, hot packs, position changes, hypnobirthing, Lamaze breathing, jacousi tub, medication)?
  • How do you feel about fetal monitoring?
  • Who will care for the baby?
  • What is your plan to feed your baby?
  • Do you want to wear your own clothing and listen to music?

 

You can always google “birth plans” on the internet for more ideas, remembering to keep your wish list to one page!

-Kirstin Johnson, Certified Nurse Midwife

Spokane Urgent Care just got ridiculously convenient…

We are excited to announce an all-new feature at our Spokane Urgent Care locations: online check-in! Not only can you save your place in line, but also view wait times, all at the push of a button. We know your time is precious, instead of sitting in the waiting room; you can wait at home, run errands, or just get a cup of coffee while you are waiting for your turn in the cue.  Does a time work better for you? You are in charge! Go to spokaneurgentcare.org, select which one of our convenient locations works best, and select the time you would like to come in!

 

 

 

 

Great care and convenience? Urgent care doesn’t get much better than this.

5 Things You Can Do To Prepare for Bloomsday!

How do you get prepared for Bloomsday? Training for any race takes dedication and hard work. With Bloomsday just around the corner, we put together a list of 5 things you can do to get prepped for the big race.

Bloomsday

  1. Get started on a running or walking program

There are endless options out there to improve your endurance when preparing for a long distance run or walk, so find one that best caters to your needs and goals. Interval training is a great way to get your heart rate up and give your body the boost it needs to keep running during steady periods of time. If you plan on walking, it’s a good idea to get into a weekly or even daily walking routine to prepare your muscles and joints for the 7 mile trek through Spokane streets—it’s also a great excuse to do some sightseeing as the weather begins to warm up!

  1. Join a team or get a partner

Exercising with other people can often be a lot more fun than just going by yourself. When we have a reliable teammate or partner to push us, we tend to reach past our own expectations and reach our goals for efficiently. Find someone who is going to give you that push you need and you may just build a lifelong exerciseship.

 

  1. Increase your water intake

It is recommended that the average person drinks between 5-8 eight ounce glasses of water a day. When preparing for the big race, it’s important to consistently drink water throughout the day and get in the habit of drinking water BEFORE you are even thirsty. Though Bloomsday doesn’t take place during a hot month, 7.5 miles often takes a lot of sweat—refuel and recharge.

 

  1. Visit your physician

Though Bloomsday participants run and walk at all levels, it’s a good idea to visit your health care provider before starting a training program to make sure your heath is not at risk. They can also let you know if your finish time goal is reasonable and give you tips for proper training.

 

  1. Start stretching regularly

It is always good to stretch before and after doing any strenuous physical activity, but daily stretching is great at increasing flexibility to prevent future injury. If you don’t have much experience with stretching, taking up a Yoga class or even finding a TV program that teaches stretching, Yoga or Pilates at home could be beneficial to your Bloomsday experience.

Katiah Peterson, Communications Assistant

Talking with baby

Community Health Association of Spokane Valley Clinic

 

Did you know something as simple as talking to your baby can help them be more successful in school?  75% of your baby’s brain development occurs in the first 2 years of life.  You are your baby’s first teacher!  The more words they are exposed to during this time the better.  Simple things like telling your child what you are doing, “Mommy is making your bottle now,” and pointing out things you see, “Look at the big red ball,” help their language develop.  You may be tempted to turn the TV on and let your baby be exposed to language that way.  Unfortunately, studies have shown this actually makes their language development worse.  Instead, turn the tv off and talk directly to your baby throughout the day, making eye contact with them, and giving them a chance to respond.  This helps with language and communication skills that are needed throughout life.

Books and songs are another way to help develop their language skills.  Sing simple songs over and over again, and you will quickly see that they will begin to recognize the song.  Exposing them to books is a great opportunity.  You might find your 6 month old baby has no interest in sitting down and reading a book, but let them explore books.  They will probably start by sticking it in their mouth, but soon they will start looking at the pictures, and before you know it they will have their own favorite book.  Your baby may not want to sit on your lap and read the entire book.  That’s ok!  Flip through the book with them.  Point out different pictures.  Practice animal sounds.  Your baby will enjoy the time spent cuddling with you, while also building a foundation for their developing language and a love for reading.

By Ashlee Mickelson, Physician