Grant Provides Dental Equipment Upgrade at Denny Murphy Clinic

Thank you so much to the Arcora Foundation for a grant helping us to purchase some much needed dental equipment! 

Denny Murphy Clinic’s existing dental equipment, some of which has been in service for 20+ years, has been well-maintained to maximize the full life of each piece. However, the equipment is coming to its end of life. Upgrading and modernizing the clinic’s equipment will ensure continuity in access to integrated medical and dental services for the underserved, high-risk patients in Spokane’s downtown core. Moreover, new technologies will greatly improve workflow efficiency.

New cutting-edge equipment will provide for earlier detection of tooth decay and significantly improved patient experience. It will enhance teamwork and make dental care easier for patients, dentists, and hygienists. Accordingly, it also will make it easier to recruit and retain dental staff. Above all, new technologies will greatly improve staff workflow efficiency, meaning more productive patient visits and increased oral health for patients.

5 Things You Can Do To Prepare for Bloomsday 2020!

Bloomsday 2020 is quickly approaching and on May 3rd 2020, nearly 50,000 people will take the streets of Spokane to run, jog, or walk their way through 7.5 miles.

The question though, what can I be doing now to get prepared for Bloomsday? Just like any race, training for Bloomsday takes dedication and hard work, we put together a list of 5 things you can do to get prepped for the big race.

Bloomsday
  • Get started on a running or walking program

There are endless options out there to improve your endurance when preparing for a long-distance run or walk, so find one that best caters to your needs and goals. Interval training is a great way to get your heart rate up and give your body the boost it needs to keep running during steady periods of time. If you plan on walking, it’s a good idea to get into a weekly or even daily walking routine to prepare your muscles and joints for the 7.5-mile trek through Spokane streets—it’s also a great excuse to do some sightseeing as the weather begins to warm up!

  • Join a team or get a partner

Exercising with other people can often be a lot more fun than just going by yourself. When we have a reliable teammate or partner to push us, we tend to reach past our own expectations and reach our goals efficiently. Find someone who is going to give you that push you need and you may just build a lifelong love for exercise.

  • Increase your water intake

It is recommended that the average person drinks between 5-8 eight-ounce glasses of water a day. When preparing for the big race, it’s important to consistently drink water throughout the day and get in the habit of drinking water BEFORE you are even thirsty. Though Bloomsday doesn’t take place during a hot month, 7.5 miles often takes a lot of sweat—refuel and recharge.

  • Visit your physician

Though Bloomsday participants run and walk at all levels, it’s a good idea to visit your health care provider before starting a training program to make sure your health is not at risk. They can also let you know if your finish time goal is reasonable and give you tips for proper training.

  • Start stretching regularly

It is always good to stretch before and after doing any strenuous physical activity, but daily stretching is great at increasing flexibility to prevent future injury. If you don’t have much experience with stretching, taking up a Yoga class or even finding a TV program that teaches stretching, Yoga or Pilates at home could be beneficial to your Bloomsday experience.

Most importantly, have fun! Bloomsday 2020 is a great way to connect with family, friends, and community – all while enjoying some exercise. We hope to see you out there this year. For more information on Bloomsday 2020, check out https://www.bloomsdayrun.org/ .

Top 5 Things You Need to Know About Coronavirus | COVID-19

CHAS Health is dedicated to the health and wellness of the communities we serve. Recent global events have raised questions about the coronavirus (COVID-19) and how to stay healthy. Below are answers to frequently asked questions. If you still have concerns for your health related to the coronavirus, please call us for more information at 509.444.8200 or 208.848.8300.

1. What is coronavirus aka COVID-19?

COVID-19 is the official name of the disease that is causing this 2019 coronavirus outbreak, first discovered in Wuhan China. The virus likely originated in animals and spread to humans. There are many types of human coronaviruses, including some that cause mild, cold-like illnesses. Some coronaviruses can cause illnesses in certain types of animals, such as cattle, camels and bats. This was the case with SARS and MERS. In rare cases, animal coronavirus cases can spread to humans.

2. How is the virus spread?

The way this virus is spread is not yet fully understood. However, based on other coronaviruses, it may spread between people by coughing and sneezing into the air, close personal contact, such as touching or shaking hands, touching an object or surface with the virus on it, then touching your mouth, nose, or eyes before washing your hands, and rarely through stool contamination with the virus present.

3. What are the symptoms of COVID-19 infection?

Symptoms include fever, cough and shortness of breath. Other symptoms can include runny nose, headache, and sore throat, and rarely digestive problems such as diarrhea or stomachache.

4. How can I protect myself from getting the virus?

The most important thing you should do is clean your hands frequently, especially before touching your face or eating. When you wash your hands, use soap and water for at least 20 seconds. Use alcohol-based hand sanitizer if soap and water are not available. Avoid close contact with people who are sick, and cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when you cough or sneeze, then throw tissue away and wash your hands. Clean and disinfect objects and surfaces. Stay home and away from others if you are feeling ill.

5. I think I’m experiencing symptoms of coronavirus, what do I do?

If you have traveled from a high-risk area (currently identified by the CDC as China, Japan, South Korea, Italy and Iran) or you have symptoms of fever, cough, or shortness of breath and feel you may have been exposed to this virus:

• Do not go to Urgent Care or the Emergency Room

• Call you doctor if you’re experiencing symptoms

• Washington CHAS Health Patients: 509.444.8200

• Idaho CHAS Health Patients: 208.848.8300


Learn more FAQs about coronavirus (COVID-19) at https://chas.org/health-alerts

Winter Weather Safety

Winter is here and kids are excited to get outside and play in the snow. Parents know that the cold temperatures can also bring potential dangers. Fortunately, there are several steps you can take to keep your family safe this time of year.

 

Dress for the Weather:

-Dress children in layers when they go outside to help them stay warm and dry. This should include a hat, gloves or mittens, warm socks and waterproof boots. Make sure to remove and replace any wet clothes right away.

– Remember that sun sunscreen and sunglasses are important this time of year because the snow reflects the sun’s UV rays.

-Give your child a snack before they go outside. It’s also a good idea to have children come inside about once every hour to warm up and drink fluids.

 

Use Caution when Participating in Winter Sports:

-Children and teens should wear a properly fitted helmet for skiing, snowboarding and sledding.

-Avoid sledding on steep hills or areas where there are trees, large rocks, or busy streets nearby.

-The American Academy of Pediatrics advises that teens younger than 16 should not operate snowmobiles and children younger than 6 should not ride on them.

 

Be Aware of Signs of Danger:

-Signs of frostbite are pale, grey or blistered skin. Frostbite most commonly occurs on the ears, nose, fingers, and toes. If you think your child has frostbite, seek medical care.

-Signs of hypothermia are shivering, slurred speech, clumsiness and confusion. If you suspect your child has hypothermia, call 911 immediately.

 

Keep Your Family Safe Inside the Home:

-Make sure that smoke and carbon monoxide alarms are installed and in working order on every level of the home and in all sleeping areas.

-Be careful around fires. Put a protective gate around the fireplace if there are small children in the house.

-Keep an emergency kit at home and in the car. Stock the kit with extra blankets and clothes, flashlights, batteries, matches, a first aid kit, bottled water, and non-perishable food.

 

Washing hands frequently and keeping your family’s immunizations up to date are also important ways to stay healthy this winter.

Time is Running Out! Open Enrollment Ends Dec. 7

Medicare Open Enrollment is an annual period during which Medicare plan enrollees can change their Medicare Advantage plan or Medicare prescription drug plan. This is also a great time to review if you are eligible for other programs that could save you money on Medicare premiums or prescription drug costs.

Medicare Open Enrollment runs until December 7, 2018 and any changes made during this time will be effective January 1, 2019.

Need to review your options? We have an opportunity to meet with State Health Insurance Benefit Advisors (SHIBA) next Monday, December 3rd from 1-4 pm at our Maple Street Clinic, 3919 N Maple St.

Learn more: https://chas.org/MedicareAEP

Pokémon Go, For Your Health?

If you’ve seen an increased number of people walking and biking around town with their phones glued to their faces, there’s a strong chance they are searching for a Charmander, Snorlax, or one of the other 151 Pokémon varieties. Of course we’re talking about Pokémon Go, the latest interactive app to blow up your Facebook and Twitter feed. The coolest part of the app (aside from finding a Squirtle in your backyard), is it’s actually helping people to get outside and exercise more.

Released last week, Pokémon Go is an interactive game that uses your phone’s GPS, camera,  and clock to detect where and when you are in the game and make Pokémon “appear” around using augmented reality. The Pokemon that the players catch can be powered up and used to take over or train at local gyms (usually monuments, churches, other public spaces). Different types of creatures appear as you move around your city, with the variety changing as you move from block to block. You’re literally chasing Pokémon around your city, which is making this game a huge hit and an excellent addition to your exercise regimen.

Many people using the app have seen significant increases in their steps since they began playing.

In addition, some Pokémon Go players are seeing mental health benefits. Simply by getting outside and taking a short walk (sometimes with friends) players are helping themselves to battle anxiety and depression. The game can be played solo or with a group of friends/strangers.

Tumblr user Ari is one of them. She has anxiety and depression and for the past three years has avoided leaving the house unless absolutely necessary.

“I have struggled with motivation and energy since I was 9, when I developed severe depression. After that, when I was 15, I developed CPTSD [complex post-traumatic stress disorder] from an abusive relationship that left me completely socially phobic, and starting then I was barely able to leave my house for fear of seeing people.

“But as soon as I got Pokemon Go I was able to leave the house, and I walked outside for hours and suddenly found myself enjoying it. I had the instant rush of dopamine whenever I caught a Pokémon, and I wanted to keep going. Then today and yesterday I purposely put myself in social situations, going to the mall, just to play. And best of all I enjoyed it.

“I think it’s partially because it gives an instant reward. It’s not like going out, having an awful experience, and getting praise after. It’s going out and getting that instant positive affirmation that makes going outside a good experience. I guess most people get that with being social or doing other activities.”

 

Of course the exercise is a side effect of playing Pokémon Go, which is at its core an incredibly fun way  to try and see if you can “catch ‘em all”. It brings back a sense of nostalgia, childhood wonder, and lets players explore their environment.

Now, if someone can help me find a Pikachu in Spokane, that would be amazing.

-Matt Grebe & Rachael Chambers, CHAS Health Communications Team