History of Health Centers | NHCW 2020

Health Centers began as part of President Lyndon B. Johnson’s Great Society Program in 1966 and were first known as ‘neighborhood’ health centers. The program was developed to provide access to affordable, high-quality preventive and primary care in medically underserved communities and for underserved populations, including millions of individuals without health insurance. The Health Center program was permanently authorized under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA), signed into law March 2010.

Health Centers have a proud history of bi-partisan support. President George W. Bush championed the ‘Presidential Five-Year Initiative to Expand Health Centers’ (2002-2006), effectively doubling the size of the program. Under President Barack Obama’s Administration, the Health Center program continued to experience unprecedented growth. Health Centers were the only health care providers to receive direct funding in the 2009 American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), which granted $2 billion to construct and expand Health Centers. The next year, the ACA was signed into law mandating $11 billion in new Health Center funding over five years (2011-2015). In April 2015, Congress passed legislation to continue Health Center funding for an additional two-years, reflective at the amount of additional annual funding received through the ACA.

We are proud of our roots and so thankful to every one of our patients we have the privilege to serve.

Addressing Social Determinants of Health – NHCW Public Health in Housing Day

In today’s value-based care environment, organizations are accountable for improving health outcomes and lowering costs. To achieve these goals and succeed in such an environment, organizations need to better understand their patients to address both their clinical and non-clinical needs and impact the root causes of health, including patients’ health behaviors, health outcomes, and health costs. The social determinants of health (SDH) are the conditions in which people live, work, play and age. They can encompass socioeconomic conditions, environmental conditions, institutional power, and social networks. Understanding patients’ social determinants will allow health centers to transform care with integrated services to meet the needs of their patients, address the social determinants of health, and demonstrate the value the bring to patients, communities and payers.

At CHAS Health, our Patient Services Coordinators work with patients to help address social determinants of health through many different avenues. In addition, we work hard with our community partners to help ensure no one falls through the cracks and has access to the services they need.

Learn about working in at CHAS Health as a Patient Services Coordinator with Stephanie:

Friendly Faces in New Spaces

During COVID-19, a great number of CHAS Health staff found both their workplaces and roles transformed.  With nonessential services suspended and many office visits converted to telephone or virtual visits, the need to check in patients at the front desk diminished and had the potential to compromise patient and staff safety if continued.  Toni Hites from the CHAS Latah Community Health clinic in Moscow, Idaho found herself still greeting patients, but instead of operating from the comfort of the clinic’s front office, she was now something like an extremely friendly healthcare bouncer–posted outside the clinic front door, donned nose to knees in protective gear.

“I have been enjoying my new role as a greeter, because I get to meet all of the dental people. It has been great getting to know my co-workers who I would not usually get to work with this closely. I have also gotten to know my pharmacy co-workers as well.  We have a great team here at Latah CHAS, and they have made this fun even in these difficult times.  I have also gotten to hear from the patients how they appreciate all we do for them, like running in to get their prescriptions for them.”

If you are a CHAS Health patient needing pharmacy services, give as a call at (509) 444-8200 in Washington or (208) 838-8300 in Idaho.

This blog post is part of a special CHAS Health Foundation series for #GivingTuesdayNow. #GivingTuesdayNow is a global day of giving and unity that will take place on May 5, 2020 as an emergency response to the unprecedented need caused by COVID-19.  #GivingTuesdayNow emphasizes opportunities to give back to communities and causes in safe ways that allow for social connection and kindness even while practicing physical distancing. #GivingTuesdayNow is a global day of giving that focuses on the collective power that individuals, communities and organizations use to celebrate generosity and philanthropy worldwide.

This mission of the CHAS Health Foundation is to create health equity by strategically investing in patients, partners, and communities. The CHAS Health Foundation supports CHAS Health, a non-profit community health center serving over 97,000 patients annually regardless of their insurance status or ability to pay. You can donate to the CHAS Health Foundation at: https://donatenow.networkforgood.org/CHAS

The time is always right to do what is right

Martin Luther King Jr. Day is an annual federal holiday that celebrates a civil rights leader and movement that challenged racial segregation and inequality.  

Dr. King believed that “Ultimately a great nation is a compassionate nation. No individual or nation can be great if it does not have a concern for ‘the least of these’.”

Respect for human dignity, social responsibility, and patient-centered are all CHAS Health core values that closely align with that statement. In fact, the very concept of the Federally Qualified Health Center was born as part of the civil rights movement in the 1960s.

CHAS Health is proud of its origin which is rooted in this movement.

Community Health Centers as a model in the United States were officially established in the 1960s as part of the “War on Poverty” program, with the goal of providing health and social service to underserved and disenfranchised populations.

CHAS Health was founded in 1994 with this goal at the heart of its mission and has continued striving to expand access and improve the quality of care for our patients. 

As we mark another celebration of his life, CHAS Health will be pausing clinical operations for the day (Monday, January 20th). We hope you join us in honoring Dr. King in whatever way you see fit. Folks who live in Spokane are welcome to check out the MLK Unity March & Resource fair.

https://www.inlander.com/spokane/mlk-unity-march-and-resource-fair/Event?oid=18921983

Menopause

Menopause

AKA

The Climacteric, The Change of Life, or my favorite:

MANopause.  That’s right, fella’s, back away slowly…

Throughout a woman’s life, hormones are constantly shifting and changing, rising, and falling, performing an intricate dance.  When the ovaries reach the end of their lifespan, on average around the age of 50, they no longer produce the hormones estrogen and progesterone.  For some women this happens suddenly and they are thrust into distressing symptoms such as irregular periods, heavy  bleeding, hot flashes, night sweats, vaginal dryness and pain with sex, low sex drive, anxiety, irritability, and even depression.  Perimenopause, the years before the official diagnosis of menopause, can last 10 years or more.  When you have not had a period for an entire year, we can officially say you are in menopause.

One of the most common distressing symptoms are called “hot flashes”. Hot flashes begin as a sudden sensation of heat centered on the upper chest and face that rapidly becomes generalized.  The sensation of heat lasts from two to four minutes, is often associated with profuse perspiration and occasionally palpitations, and is sometimes followed by chills, shivering, and a feeling of anxiety.  Hot flashes may range from less than one each day to as many as one per hour during the day and night.  On average, symptoms last 5 years but 30% of women have symptoms for 10 years and 9% of women have symptoms for 20 years

Modern medicine can offer relief from distressing symptoms, but there is no “cure” for this very natural life process.  As with any medication, there are risks and benefits.  A discussion with your provider can help you decide if medication or hormone replacement therapy is right for you.

Thankfully, there are many things you can do to manage symptoms at home.  These suggestions are basic recommendations for self-care:

For the management of hot flashes and night sweats:

  1. Lower the room temperature
  2. Use fans
  3. Dress in layers that can be easily shed
  4. Wear a base layer that wicks moisture away from your skin.
  5. Avoid spicy food, hot drinks, alcohol, stress
  6. Weight Loss

To keep your mood and emotions steady:

  1. Daily Exercise
  2. Daily Yoga or other mindful meditation and relaxation

For vaginal dryness and pain with sex:

  1. Use a vaginal moisturizer three times a week.
  2. Use lubrication for sex.
  3. Sorry, we have no great medical solution for libido

 

To protect your bones, support your immune system, and promote sleep:

  1. 1200mg of Calcium
  2. 400mg Magnesium
  3. 2000IU Vitamin D daily.

Calcium is only absorbed 500mg at a time so taking a supplement twice a day with meals, in addition to at least one serving of dairy or other calcium fortified food daily will supply what you need. The Vitamin D helps your body absorb the calcium and it activates it in your muscle and bone cells so it can work for you.  Magnesium and Vitamin D help with mood and a healthy immune system, too.

For more information on perimenopause and menopause, you can explore the following:

The Wisdom of Menopause, by Christiane Northrup, M.D.

www.menopause.org/for-women

https://www.nia.nih.gov/health/publication/menopause

-Kirstin Johnson, Certified Nurse Midwife

Welcome to Summer!

 

Helmets– Are highly recommended with all wheeled sports. You only have one head and need to protect that brain for many years to come. If you happen to get in a wreck, get help to make sure you don’t have a serious injury.

Swimming– We have so many awesome lakes, rivers, and pools within a short distance which is why it’s important to practice good water safety. Even if you’re a good swimmer, make sure someone is around to watch you.

Sunblock- We recommend you use a sunblock that covers both UVA and UVB; and an SPF of 70 would be best (with the way most people put on sunblock you only get about half the SPF number listed on the bottle). Don’t forget to drink lots of cool water when the heat rises outside or if you’ve been sweating more than usual! Be sure to stay hydrated to keep your body from overheating.

Camp Physicals-Summertime is a great time to go to camp! Ask your parents to call and schedule an annual physical appointment now so you’re ready for all your activities at camp – and get a jump on the next school year.

Summer Treats– What summer is complete without a few sweets? Remember that we don’t get a summer break from brushing our teeth; we have to do it every day. If you haven’t been into the dentist in a while, now is a great time to let your tooth shine. For extra protection, remember we also have fluoride supplements for kids from 6 months old until 16 years old.

Last, but not least, make sure you talk with your parents about expectations for summer, make sure you know your home address, parent’s phone, and who to contact in case of emergency. Have a fun and safe summer!

Senator Maria Cantwell stops by CHAS Health to talk about Basic Health.

United States Senator Maria Cantwell stopped by CHAS Health’s Maple Street Clinic to urge Washington State to bring back Basic Health Plan.

Basic Health is a federal program that was modeled after Washington State’s Basic Health Plan, which went away when the WA HealthPlanFinder Marketplace website was implemented. This program would help patients who have had difficulty affording the cost of Marketplace Plans.

Cantwell was joined by Washington State Representative Marcus Riccelli, CHAS Health CEO, Aaron Wilson, the Native Project CEO, Toni Lodge, and other advocates urging the state to adopt the affordable insurance program again. Cantwell said it could help about 162,000 people in Washington, who earn between $16,242 and $23,540 annually, which is just above the Medicaid eligibility rate. “The Federal Basic Health Plan will help patients maintain affordable coverage and will also reduce unnecessary health system costs by enabling patients to maintain continuity of coverage instead of churning between the Apple Health program and the exchange plans” says Wilson.Cantwell press conference chas

“Our state has been an innovator in health care in so many ways, and Basic Health is just another example of that.” Cantwell said, now that we have the basic health plan as a federal option, currently a family of 4 in Spokane with an income of 48,000 per year could have these options. Right now, paying a monthly premium of $259/month for a private plan on the exchange, that same family in New York under the Basic Health Plan is paying just $20/month. If the Basic Health Plan had similar premiums…that family could save over $2886/per year.”

Many families are, “literally one broken arm away for their kids to sending them in to financial hardship.”

It’s a plan that saves the consumer money, improves the overall health of our community, and it saves the state money. There could be more than 10,000 people in Spokane that would qualify for the Basic Health Plan.Cantwell press conference chas 3

 

Spokane Urgent Care just got ridiculously convenient…

We are excited to announce an all-new feature at our Spokane Urgent Care locations: online check-in! Not only can you save your place in line, but also view wait times, all at the push of a button. We know your time is precious, instead of sitting in the waiting room; you can wait at home, run errands, or just get a cup of coffee while you are waiting for your turn in the cue.  Does a time work better for you? You are in charge! Go to spokaneurgentcare.org, select which one of our convenient locations works best, and select the time you would like to come in!

 

 

 

 

Great care and convenience? Urgent care doesn’t get much better than this.

Who needs sleep?

What is the one thing we spend the most time doing?  Sleeping!  Sleeping is a very important part of our life and contributes to our health.  Getting a good amount of sleep gives our body time to rest, and our brain time to make new connections.  When we don’t get enough sleep we can see the effects in many areas of our lives:  difficulty concentrating, poor attention, poor judgment, decreased ability to learn, depressed mood, and even obesity, heart disease, and a depressed immune system.

Do you think your children are getting the sleep that they need to be successful in school and in relationships with friends and family?  A National Sleep Foundation study recently found that 85% of teens do not get adequate sleep!  Adequate sleep means 8-10 hours every night for a teenager and 9-11 hours a night for a school age child.

Poor sleep has become a larger problem over the last 20 years.  What can you do to help ensure your child gets enough sleep?  Here are a few sleep tips to try:

  1. Maintain a consistent bedtime.  It is important for your body to always get up and go to bed around the same time, trying to limit fluctuations to 1 hour or less.  This includes the weekends, holidays, and summer break.  For older kids, avoid naps.  Naps make it more difficult to fall asleep at bedtime.
  2. Make sure the room is cool, dark, and quiet. Use your bed only for sleep, not for playing or punishment.
  3. Eliminate caffeine or nicotine from your diet, especially after noon. The effects of caffeine on sleep can last for 8 hours!
  4. Try to spend some time outside in the sun during the day. Spending time in a dark house confuses the brain into thinking it is nighttime.  Natural light during daytime is the best way to make sure your circadian rhythms are on track.
  5. Make up a relaxing bedtime routine. Try to always follow the same schedule so your kids know what to expect.  Some good ideas are a shower, story time, listening to calm music, or writing in a journal.
  6. Eliminate one of the biggest enemies of sleep from the bedroom: The Screen!  Looking at screens, especially screens from phones or tablets actually make your brain believe it is day and not night so your brain doesn’t release the sleep inducing hormone melatonin.  Studies have shown people who have tvs in their bedroom get less sleep on average each night.  It takes longer to fall asleep and you are less likely to stay sleep when there is a TV in your bedroom.  Remove technology from the bedroom!

Try the above tips and see if you and your children start getting better sleep.

Sleeping_angel

We love Cheney!

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For over 20 years, CHAS Health has made its way through the Pacific Northwest and into the hearts of many. With 12 various locations including Lewiston, Clarkston, Latah and Deer Park, the CHAS community has continued to expand to now include the Cheney area.

CHAS Health is a non-profit, federally qualified health center. We provide medical, dental, pharmacy and behavioral health services to everyone, regardless of insurance status. Currently, CHAS serves approximately 52,000 patients each year and is a “patient led” organization. CHAS’ mission is to “improve the overall health of the communities we serve by expanding access to quality health and wellness services.”

With the opening of the new Cheney Health Center, CHAS hopes to continue to grow and foster wellness in all communities. For many, the new facility will remove the commute to Spokane for healthcare, provide students with a health care alternative, and give residents the opportunity to confront their healthcare needs in a safe, friendly, and affordable environment.

Stay tuned for our in-clinic pharmacy – coming spring 2016!

Hours

Monday – Friday    9am – 4pm

Located at 1720 2nd St. Cheney, WA 99004

To schedule an appointment, please call (509)444-8200

 

By Katiah Peterson