5 Things You Can Do To Prepare for Bloomsday!

  1. Get started on a running or walking program

There are endless options out there to improve your endurance when preparing for a long distance run or walk, so find one that best caters to your needs and goals. Interval training is a great way to get your heart rate up and give your body the boost it needs to keep running during steady periods of time. If you plan on walking, it’s a good idea to get into a weekly or even daily walking routine to prepare your muscles and joints for the 7 mile trek through Spokane streets—it’s also a great excuse to do some sightseeing as the weather begins to warm up!

  1. Join a team or get a partner

Exercising with other people can often be a lot more fun than just going by yourself. When we have a reliable teammate or partner to push us, we tend to reach past our own expectations and reach our goals for efficiently. Find someone who is going to give you that push you need and you may just build a lifelong exerciseship.

 

  1. Increase your water intake

It is recommended that the average person drinks between 5-8 eight ounce glasses of water a day. When preparing for the big race, it’s important to consistently drink water throughout the day and get in the habit of drinking water BEFORE you are even thirsty. Though Bloomsday doesn’t take place during a hot month, 7.5 miles often takes a lot of sweat—refuel and recharge.

 

  1. Visit your physician

Though Bloomsday participants run and walk at all levels, it’s a good idea to visit your health care provider before starting a training program to make sure your heath is not at risk. They can also let you know if your finish time goal is reasonable and give you tips for proper training.

 

  1. Start stretching regularly

It is always good to stretch before and after doing any strenuous physical activity, but daily stretching is great at increasing flexibility to prevent future injury. If you don’t have much experience with stretching, taking up a Yoga class or even finding a TV program that teaches stretching, Yoga or Pilates at home could be beneficial to your Bloomsday experience.

March is National Nutrition Month!

National Nutrition Month (NNM) is celebrated every year during the month of March. It is a nutrition education campaign that focuses on the importance of providing science-based nutrition information to help people with making healthy lifestyle changes. It was created and promoted by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics starting in 1973, originally in the form of National Nutrition Week.

Every year, a theme is chosen for NNM. Recent past themes have included, “Go Further with Food”, “Put Your Best Fork Forward”, “Bite Into a Healthy Lifestyle”, and “Savor the Flavor of Eating Right”. The theme this year is a simple one – National Nutrition Month. This year’s focus is back to the core purpose of NNM, which is “to increase the public’s awareness of the importance of good nutrition and position registered dietitian nutritionists as the authorities in nutrition.” The key messages of the 2019 NNM theme are:

  1. Discover the benefits of a healthy eating style.
  2. Choose foods and drinks that are good for your health.
  3. Include a variety of healthful foods from all of the food groups on a regular basis.
  4. Select healthier options when eating away from home.
  5. Be mindful of portion sizes. Eat and drink the amount that’s right for you, as MyPlate encourages us to do.
  6. Keep it simple. Eating right doesn’t have to be complicated.
  7. Make food safety part of your everyday routine.
  8. Help to reduce food waste by considering the foods you have on hand before buying more at the store.
  9. Find activities that you enjoy and be physically active most days of the week.
  10. Consult the nutrition experts. Registered Dietitian Nutritionists can provide sound, easy-to-follow personalized nutrition advice to meet your lifestyle, preferences and health-related needs.

 

As you can see, there is special attention on making the public aware of a most valuable resource for nutrition information…registered dietitians or registered dietitian nutritionists (RD/RDN).

 

What is a RD/RDN?

A RD/RDN is considered to be a food and nutrition expert, armed with a wealth of knowledge to share with those interested in making diet or activity changes to enjoy a more healthy lifestyle.

What is the difference between a dietitian and a nutritionist?

In order to become a RD, a person must complete certain requirements, which include obtaining a degree in a health-related field from an accredited college or university, completing a supervised internship, and pass an examination. The title “nutritionist” is not regulated and anyone with basic background knowledge of nutrition might call themselves a nutritionist. Just remember, every dietitian is a nutritionist, but not every nutritionist is a dietitian.

As part of NNM, we celebrate our RD/RDNs on National RD/RDN Day, which is always the second Wednesday of March. And did you know that CHAS has several dietitians on staff? We are armed and ready to help come alongside you to help you to achieve your health and wellness goals.

Parenting Through Puberty

I know when my oldest let me know about the changes, I wasn’t ready.  I had prepared my child with what to expect, gotten her some nice books about it that we read together. But, when the time arrived, I thought, “already?”

The changes of puberty are different for every child, but there are some points that help know what’s ahead, just around the corner.

Physical Changes

 

For girls, the changes of puberty start between 8 and 13 years old.  Usually the first sign is breast development.  It commonly takes about two years to get from there to the first menses, or period.  Along the way, development of pubertal hair and a growth spurt usually ensue as well.  When girls start menses, it can be irregular in the first year, but it tends to become more regular with time.

For boys, the changes of puberty start between 9 and 14 years of age.  This starts with genitals enlarging, followed by pubertal hair.  Then they will develop increased muscle mass and voice changes, with the start of these averaging at 13 ½ years old. The peak height for boys is usually reached by 17 years old, 2 years past that for girls.

Both girls and boys will have other changes as well, including hair growth, acne, and body odor.  If you have questions or concerns about whether your child’s patterns are normal, it’s important to ask your healthcare provider.

Emotional Changes

 

Along with the physical changes, there are many emotional changes with puberty as well. Adolescent youth begin to become more independent and less interested in having the attention of their parents.  Some will lose their temper more easily and have more mood swings.  It’s important to keep the conversation open with these changes, both physical and emotional.  Being positively and proactively involved in your child life, even when it’s not invited, helps them know you support them when they need it.

Puberty is Starting Earlier

 

Despite the normal ranges of puberty described above, the onset of puberty has gotten earlier over the years. The cause is unclear, but we know several factors can lead to an earlier start.  Trends from lifestyle factors include an earlier start for girls with more sugar intake (independent of weight), also an earlier start for girls with obesity.  There are differences in the start of puberty with different racial background as well, with puberty often occurring earlier in African-American children.


Booklist

 

Some books that may help open the conversation with you and your child include “The Care and Keeping of You: A Body Book for Girls” by Valerie Lee Schafer and “Guy Stuff: the Body Book” by Dr. Cara Natterson.  These are appropriate for kids 8 years old and up according to Common Sense Media, a website with recommendations on books and movies for kids that are age appropriate.


Are My Child’s Changes Normal?

 

If your girl starts showing signs of puberty before 8 years old or your boy before 9, it’s worth bringing up with your provider to discuss further.  Similarly, if your girl has not started these changes by the time she reaches 13 or your boy by 14, that’s a good reason to discuss as well. Your annual well-child visits are a great opportunity for providers to evaluate these development milestones and make sure things are on track. Please make sure to keep up-to-date on these important visits.

Entering into the next stage can be an intimidating phase for parents and kids alike, but it’s all about being there for your child in an open and honest way.

By Dr. Deborah Wiser, Chief Medical Officer