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Black Bean & Avocado Brownies

Ingredients:
1 can black beans, rinsed and drained
1/2 cup unsweetened cocoa powder
3 eggs
1/4 cup coconut oil, melted
2/3 cup coconut sugar or
substitute with brown sugar
1/4 tsp. salt
1 tsp. baking powder
1 tsp. vanilla
1 medium avocado
Dark chocolate chips, enough to
cover top of batter when in pan,
about 1/2 cup-3/4 cup

Directions:
Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Mix all ingredients in a food processor (except the chocolate chips) until smooth.
Grease an 8×8 inch baking pan with nonstick spray or oil and scoop brownie batter into pan. You can mix in some chocolate chips in at this point too. Sprinkle enough chocolate chips to cover the top of batter.
Cook for 38-40 minutes or until you poke the brownies with a toothpick and it comes out clean.
Let sit for 20 minutes before you cut. Store in fridge and enjoy!

Notes:
Flourless + Gluten Free
Drizzle with peanut butter if desired

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Festive Fruit Kabobs

Ingredients:
A variety of seasonal fruit:
kiwi, star fruit, persimmon, oranges, pears, apples, pineapple
Mini skewers
1 cup low fat plain yogurt
2-3 Tbsp. honey
1/2 tsp. vanilla
Pinch cinnamon

Directions:
1. Cut the fruit into equal sized pieces and thread onto skewers.
2. Whisk together the yogurt, honey, vanilla and cinnamon.
3. Serve skewers with the yogurt sauce.

Notes:
Nutrition facts vary depending on type of fruit and yogurt used.

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Pumpkin Pie Parfaits

Ingredients:
10 oz. pumpkin yogurt
1 cup 100% Pumpkin Pie Puree
1 Tbsp. honey
1 cup heavy cream
2 Tbsp. powdered sugar
1 tsp. vanilla extract
15 Ginger Snap Cookies
garnish: sprinkle of cinnamon and white chocolate shreds

Directions:
In a small bowl, whisk together the pumpkin, yogurt and honey. In a food processor, pulse the cookies until well blended and turn into a crumb.
In a stand mixer, add the heavy cream. Using the whip attachment, beat the cream until stiff peaks form. Blend in the sugar and vanilla extract. (You will have extra whipped cream)
In a glass of choice for the parfaits, layer the pumpkin mixture first followed by 1 tablespoon ginger snap crumbs and then 2 tablespoons whipped cream. Layer until glass is full or desired amount is added. You can serve with a sprinkle of cinnamon on top and shaved white chocolate. Enjoy immediately—if you try to make this too far in advance, the crumb layer may get soggy!

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Winter Weather Safety

Winter is here and kids are excited to get outside and play in the snow. Parents know that the cold temperatures can also bring potential dangers. Fortunately, there are several steps you can take to keep your family safe this time of year.

 

Dress for the Weather:

-Dress children in layers when they go outside to help them stay warm and dry. This should include a hat, gloves or mittens, warm socks and waterproof boots. Make sure to remove and replace any wet clothes right away.

– Remember that sun sunscreen and sunglasses are important this time of year because the snow reflects the sun’s UV rays.

-Give your child a snack before they go outside. It’s also a good idea to have children come inside about once every hour to warm up and drink fluids.

 

Use Caution when Participating in Winter Sports:

-Children and teens should wear a properly fitted helmet for skiing, snowboarding and sledding.

-Avoid sledding on steep hills or areas where there are trees, large rocks, or busy streets nearby.

-The American Academy of Pediatrics advises that teens younger than 16 should not operate snowmobiles and children younger than 6 should not ride on them.

 

Be Aware of Signs of Danger:

-Signs of frostbite are pale, grey or blistered skin. Frostbite most commonly occurs on the ears, nose, fingers, and toes. If you think your child has frostbite, seek medical care.

-Signs of hypothermia are shivering, slurred speech, clumsiness and confusion. If you suspect your child has hypothermia, call 911 immediately.

 

Keep Your Family Safe Inside the Home:

-Make sure that smoke and carbon monoxide alarms are installed and in working order on every level of the home and in all sleeping areas.

-Be careful around fires. Put a protective gate around the fireplace if there are small children in the house.

-Keep an emergency kit at home and in the car. Stock the kit with extra blankets and clothes, flashlights, batteries, matches, a first aid kit, bottled water, and non-perishable food.

 

Washing hands frequently and keeping your family’s immunizations up to date are also important ways to stay healthy this winter.

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Time is Running Out! Open Enrollment Ends Dec. 7

Medicare Open Enrollment is an annual period during which Medicare plan enrollees can change their Medicare Advantage plan or Medicare prescription drug plan. This is also a great time to review if you are eligible for other programs that could save you money on Medicare premiums or prescription drug costs.

Medicare Open Enrollment runs until December 7, 2018 and any changes made during this time will be effective January 1, 2019.

Need to review your options? We have an opportunity to meet with State Health Insurance Benefit Advisors (SHIBA) next Monday, December 3rd from 1-4 pm at our Maple Street Clinic, 3919 N Maple St.

Learn more: https://chas.org/MedicareAEP

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Rise and Shine! It’s Breakfast Time

Mornings are busy! Often times the last thing we think of before we rush out the door is breakfast. We are hurried getting the kids to school and ourselves to work on-time, maybe the kiddos are complaining they aren’t hungry, maybe they are hungry but nobody is in the mood for cold cereal, we haven’t been able to get to the grocery store and there aren’t many options…the list goes on. Yet, we know that breakfast really is the most important meal of the day. So, what can we do to make sure our children get their day started with full bellies and fueled brains?

• Take advantage of the school breakfast program: Typically,
school breakfast begins serving about 30 minutes before school
starts. Not only is it a time-saver, but it is a cost effective and healthy
option. Free and reduced meal costs are available to families who
qualify (see your child’s school for an application).

• Plan ahead: Think about breakfast the night before and even have
the kids help in breakfast planning. Put together a crockpot breakfast
meal, pre-cut fruit or veggies, assemble breakfast burritos or bake a
breakfast casserole that only needs reheating in the morning.

• Keep it simple: Whole grain toast with peanut butter, fruit
smoothie with Greek yogurt and leafy greens, bagel and cream
cheese, oatmeal with fruit, hard boiled eggs with whole grain English
muffin, and yogurt parfaits with granola and fruit are nutritious and
portable options that can be made in less than 10 minutes.

• Think outside the box: Breakfast does not have to be limited to
typical breakfast food! Dinner leftovers, quick grilled cheese and
fruit, veggie wrap, reheated pizza or even a mug of chicken soup can
be a healthful morning breakfast choice!

• Make breakfast a family habit: Be a positive role model for
your child by eating breakfast yourself every day, create breakfast
meals together and try to develop a morning routine that allows you
to sit down and have a breakfast meal together.

By Annette Anderson
RDN, CD

 

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Let’s Talk About Teeth!

Healthy teeth are an important part of a healthy body.  Spending a few minutes each day taking care of your teeth keeps your smile beautiful and your body happy.

Did you know?

Children who visit the dentist before they are four years old are less likely to need dental procedures (crown placement, restorations, tooth removal) compared with children who start seeing the dentist at a later age.

 

Keep Those Pearly Whites Shining Bright

  • Clean teeth twice daily with a soft toothbrush
  • Brush for two minutes each time (sing the ABCs in your head three times!)
  • Start flossing once per day as soon as teeth begin to touch
  • Parents should supervise brushing until at least kids are able to tie their shoes

A word about fluoride:

  • Use fluoride-containing toothpaste for all children with teeth – For children less than three years, use an amount the size of a grain of rice. For children over three, use an amount the size of a pea!
  • Most of the water in the Spokane area is non-fluoridated, consider a fluoride supplement – ask your doctor!
  • Have fluoride painted on your teeth as often as recommended by your dentist or doctor

Watch What You Eat – Your Teeth Are Counting On It!

  • Frequent snacking and sugary beverages during the day may increase the risk of dental decay
    • If you plan on snacking on sugar-containing drink (soda/juice/sports drink), drink it within a limited time instead of slowly sipping during the day
    • Try to give your mouth a three hour break between sugary foods/drinks
  • After sugary foods and beverages try rinsing your mouth with water or chewing sugarless gum
  • Watch out for: hard candy, gummy candy/vitamins, cough drops, fruit leathers

A Moment for the Young Ones:

  • The first tooth usually appears around six months of age
  • Think about scheduling the first dental visit at the one year birthday
  • Start a training cup (sippy cup) at six months. Plan to ditch all bottles by one year

Factors that increase the risk of developing dental decay:

  • Bottle use beyond 12 months of age
  • Using a sippy cup throughout the day (especially for juice/sugary drinks)
  • Exposure to secondhand smoke
  • Using a bottle at bed time
  • Breastfeeding past 12 months if nursing overnight

By Dr. Baca, MD

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Back to School

We can’t believe that summer is nearing its close and fall and school are rapidly approaching. Back-to-school time can be an exciting and nerve racking time for both kids and parents. Time for fun. Time for learning. Time for cooler temperatures. We hope you are excited for the new school year. Here are a few tips to make sure you and your kids are healthy for back to school.

Annual Checkup
Annual checkups are an important part of everyone’s health, but especially kids. When you bring your child in for a check-up, you can expect a check of vital signs, measurements, physical examination, immunizations, and a chance to discuss concerns or to ask questions. Schedule you and your kid’s annual exam. At the same time, bring all your forms for school: sports physical, asthma, allergies, and medication administration.

First Day Worries
Many children (and parents) are worried about the first days and weeks of school. You can ease these anxieties by meeting the teacher before the first day and touring the classroom. Knowing what to expect can help kids be less nervous.   Another thing you can do is to talk about the exciting things school brings (new and old friends, learning exciting new things, a new backpack).

Make Time for Healthy Choices
It is important to build time in the morning for a healthy breakfast. Studies have shown that eating breakfast helps children and teens perform better, focus better and have more energy during the school day. Encourage them to eat something with protein, to help them stay full longer. Make sure to plan out the week’s lunches to help ensure your child is eating healthy choices they will love (and while you are making their lunch, make your own too!).

Schedule
Children need schedule and routine. The school year is a big transition, so be sure to start a sleep schedule now to be prepared for school. It’s also important to schedule afternoon time that includes homework. Some kids benefit from timers, planners, checklists or supervision to help them feel successful.

Questions? Your child’s pediatrician can discuss more concerns with back to school.

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Kale and Basil Pesto

Serves: Makes 16 servings

Ingredients:

1/2 cup (100 g) grated Parmesan cheese

3 garlic cloves, peeled

2 cups (25 g) basil leaves

2 cups (35 g) kale leaves

3 Tablespoons pine nuts

1/2 cup olive oil

¼ teaspoon salt

Pinch of ground black pepper

To serve:

1lb whole wheat spaghetti

1-2 cups grape tomatoes

1 can white beans, drained and rinsed

Extra basil

Instructions:

  1. Add the cheese, garlic, basil, kale and pine nuts to a food processor and pulse to combine.
  2. With the processor running, stream in the olive oil. Blend until fully incorporated.
  3. Season with salt and pepper.
  4. Toss with cooked whole wheat spaghetti, fresh grape tomatoes and white beans. Garnish with extra basil.

Notes:

If you don’t have a food processor you can finely mince the basil, kale and garlic and whisk it with olive oil, Parmesan and salt and pepper for a more chunky version of pesto.

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Summer Caprese Salad

Serves 8

Prep Time: 20 minutes

Ingredients

2 cups balsamic vinegar

4 large ripe tomatoes

12 ounces fresh mozzarella, thickly sliced

Large bunch fresh basil leaves

Olive oil, for drizzling (about 1 tablespoon)

Large pinch kosher salt

Large pinch freshly ground black pepper

Directions

Measure the balsamic vinegar and pour into a saucepan. Bring it to a gentle boil over a low heat. Cook it until the balsamic vinegar has reduced to a nice thick glaze (but still pourable), about 15 minutes. Allow the reduction to cool to room temperature before you serve it.

When you are ready to assemble the salad, cut the tomatoes into thick slices. Arrange them on a platter, alternating them with the mozzarella slices. Tuck the whole basil leaves in between the tomato and cheese slices.

Drizzle on the balsamic reduction. Then drizzle olive oil in a thin stream over the top. Finally, sprinkle on salt and pepper.

Nutrition Facts Per Serving:

Calories 140; Total Fat 9g; Protein 11g; Carbohydrate 5g; Fiber 1g; Sugar <1g; Sodium 200mg